Times are troubling. We are supposed to stay close to our homes, not to go on road trips and Heaven forbid cross any borders. Never mind the type of border, just don’t cross them. Or cross your neighbour, for that matter. In some countries, ratting out your neighbour to the police is encouraged by the government.

Mr and Mrs House Finch

Happily in Canada we don’t go that far. Yet travelling is sometimes pointed at with accusing fingers, as if sitting alone in your car or truck will infect someone with a virus you don’t have.

In these times of confinement and quarantine, food has become an important subject. After perhaps toilet paper and hand sanitizer, that is. Whatever your opinion about the safety measures imposed on each of us during this pandemic, the subject of food has come to the forefront of many a conversation.

Fruit roll

I am not talking about all those who will now wait in line for three or more hours in order to get their fix of McFries or Kentucky Fried Ducks. These people will only think about that and never do anything about it. They need their suppliers or pushers.

The earth is flat. We all know that. Take a look at the prairies in Canada. Nothing but flatness. Shooting that flatness can be somewhat of a challenge. It appears as if you never have enough angle on your lens to cover everything you see.

Highway 202, Manitoba

Whatever you try, there is not a lens that can convey the feeling you get when looking at that flat earth all around you.

One could think that Covid-19 keeps us inside. I beg to differ. It makes me travel back in time to visit things all over again. A few months ago I was thinking about what kind of insects I had photographed. A handful, I thought, so I asked my Lightroom what it had in store for me.

Ruby Meadowhawk

To my surprise, a lot more insects than I thought. Of course, if you shoot everything that dares to show itself, you will end up with stuff you don’t remember after a while. I did have the good forethought of keywording my images when I imported them.

Our lives have changes drastically lately, albeit temporarily. For some, the change is an eye-opener, for others it’s hell on earth. I tend to be a moderate guy and often find myself halfway between two extremes. The quarantine is presented as a self-inflicted house-arrest. If you don’t stay inside, you are part of the problem.

Prop at the City Jail in Winnipeg

That is a view that goes a bit too far for me. It gets thrown on the same pile as the idea of “you should hoard toilet paper or you will be part of the problem”. For the record, I have bought one pack of TP, just like I always do. Not more, not less.