Sometimes we think that nobody knows what we are doing. And we like to keep it that way. Has it occurred to you that some “people” always seem to know where you are? Take a look at these maps in provincial parks, here in Manitoba. Whenever you look at a map, “they” always seem to know where you are. So then you check on your GPS, and yes, for sure they are right… They even put it on the map: “You are here”…

Getting that paranoia feeling? Getting that paranoia feeling?

Even worse, they seem to acknowledge the fact that it may disturb you and they even add a message that you may call “911” if this seems too much…

Hmmm, yes, that’s how I feel about many, if not most HDR pictures.  High Dynamic Range may, however, be a good way to go if your camera is not capable of seeing the way you see.

Dorchester Avenue in HDR If only my camera worked like my eyes…

The camera has some its shortcomings, whatever money you put in it. HDR or High Dynamic Range photography is one way of overcoming that limitation.

John Henry Munson was born in 1859 in Cobourg, Ontario. He was a lawyer and lived on an extensive piece of land on the borders of the Assiniboine river in Winnipeg. Today it is called Munson Park. This was the site of the house on what used to be Munson’s farm.

The entry of Munson Park today The entry of Munson Park today

The original home, built in 1889, was renovated and modernized during the time it was owned by the James Richardson family. It had its own private swimming pool and a large kitchen garden. It was demolished in 1980. Some people still call this park Richardson Park. The Richardson family then donated the land to the City of Winnipeg to make a park out of it.

Well, I haven’t been in all the world by night, but many places, yes. The saying is “Paris by night”, hmmm, no pictures of that time. Lived there for 12 years, but in the non-digital era of photography. Oh well, you’ll just have to do with some more recent places :-)

Kiev by night Kiev by night

Ok, this is my very first night picture in Kiev, Ukraine. Point ‘n’ shoot, placed firmly on a high-tension electricity pole. In the dark you can distinguish the next in line… Yep. they have those in the city there…

War can give birth to stories. World War I has given mankind a story that will never be forgotten. The story starts with Harry Colebourn. Lieutenant Harry Colebourn purchased a little American black bear from a hunter who had killed the cub’s mother. He paid $20 for it.

 DSC_0511 Harry Colebourn and his bear, 1914

A live bear for $20 might look a small price, compared to the current prices for bear cubs. Today the prices will float around $10,000 for a cub.

But this $20 bear will have changed the world of millions of children…